Why is it important: For years, Kindle users couldn’t buy ePub-published books and read them on their e-book readers — at least not without manually converting them to an Amazon-approved format. This should change later this year, but those hoping for built-in ePub support will be disappointed.

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From the first generation Set on fire launched in 2007, the brand has become almost synonymous with the term “ebook”. With the original Kindle and its later incarnations, Amazon also forced its proprietary e-book formats on users, a limitation that continues to this day.

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Last weekend a report from Good E-Reader gave hope that Amazon might soon start supporting ePub files. After 15 years of stubbornness about a format that is supported and used by almost everyone in the ebook and ebook creation business, a small update in the official Kindle documentation this seems to indicate that users will be able to use books purchased from competing services.

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However, it turns out that Amazon is not adding built-in support for ePub files, but rather making it easier for non-technical users to convert ePub files to the Kindle-specific book file format. In other words, you’ll soon be able to use the “Send to Kindle” feature to do things that would normally require a tool like Caliber, which isn’t the most user-friendly software.

The new functionality is expected to arrive later this year, but that’s not the only change coming. Amazon will also stop supporting .mobi and .azw files (essentially a renamed version of Amazon’s .mobi). This means that you will still be able to access books in any of these formats that you already have on your Kindle, but you won’t be able to download new books using Send to Kindle.