Google Launches Cloud Run Jobs for Containerized Scripted Jobs

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During the developer keynote at Google I/O 2022, Google unveiled Work in the cloud, a Google Cloud service extension for developing and deploying containerized applications using languages ​​such as Go, Python, and Java. Cloud Run jobs are designed for containers that run to completion and don’t service requests such as data processing and administrative jobs, or where multiple copies of a container need to run in parallel.

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Cloud Run was launched in 2019, adding to the rapidly growing Google Cloud serverless computing stack. As demand for serverless risesit might seem that extensions like Cloud Run jobs are an attempt to fend off competitors like Azure and Amazon Web Services.

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Available in preview today, Cloud Run jobs can be used to run a script to perform database migrations or other workloads such as sending monthly invoices. Compared to other platforms that support long-running jobs, Google claims that Cloud Run jobs run quickly once created, and simple containers run in as little as 10 seconds.

To use Cloud Run jobs, developers create a job that encapsulates all the configuration needed to run the job, including the container image, region, and environment variables. They then schedule the job to run, or manually start the job by creating a new job run.

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During preview, Cloud Run jobs support up to 50 concurrent runs from the same or different jobs for each project in a region. Users can view existing jobs, run them, and monitor the run status on the Cloud Run Jobs page in the Cloud Console; The Cloud Console does not currently support creating new jobs.

Cloud Run jobs appear with the updated firebaseGoogle’s popular back-end platform as a service, and AlloyDB, a new fully managed PostgreSQL database service. Perhaps the most interesting of the two features of AlloyDB is, as my colleague Frédéric Lardinois writes, a custom machine learning-based caching service for learning client access patterns and then converting Postgres row format to an in-memory column format that can be parsed. significantly faster.


Credit: techcrunch.com /

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