How can your data be used to charge you?

- Advertisement -


Big this week news in technology: Uber misbehaved. A huge array of documents shows that the company deliberately violated the laws in order to deploy its services as quickly and widely as possible. Of course, the company can blame its disgraced former CEO. “We are asking the public to judge us by what we have done in the past five years,” reads his pious statement. Where are you heading for this? Should Uber have paid a higher price for their actions? Or was moving fast and breaking things the only way to destroy the taxi industry? Respond in the comments. In the meantime, here’s this month’s update.

- Advertisement -
post-Caviar America
- Advertisement -

We were determination of consequences about cancellation Rowe vs. Wade, which is expected to result in a ban or severe restriction of abortion in about half of the US states. One thing that stands out is that law enforcement technology is much more advanced than it was in 1973 when Caviar it was decided. At the time, the easiest way for the police to catch illegal abortions was to raid the clinic, possibly on a tip. Unless a woman was caught red-handed, it was very difficult to prove that she had an abortion. The doctors who administered them were prime targets.

There is a huge surveillance infrastructure today, largely based on the data clouds we all create every day. prosecutors may sue location data (especially in the form of geofencing orderswho request data about everyone who was in a certain place at a certain time), search queries and social media posts, as well as data from fertility and health monitoring apps. A proposed EU regulation designed to make it easier to collect child sexual abuse records could have the side effect of: giving U.S. Attorneys more power scan phones for abortion-related messages. Not all data also require a warrant: Automatic license plate readers can be used to provide evidence that someone left the state to have an abortion or kicked someone else out, for which they can be prosecuted for aiding and abetting a crime.

- Advertisement -

This means that online platforms will also try to prevent prosecutions for inadvertently helping people with abortions. Meta at least already suppressed some abortion related content for years. Changes in the law are likely to force companies to be more careful. An example of how this can work is what happened to sex workers after the passage of FOSTA-SESTA, a 2018 law that allows platforms to be prosecuted for posting content that promotes or facilitates prostitution. These are social media platforms, payment systems and supposedly even food delivery apps suspension or shadow ban of sex workers. It will be difficult to adapt this response from state to state, so it can affect people even in states where abortion is legal.

None of these law enforcement practices are new; they have been used to catch criminals for many years. It’s just that now people in half of the country can turn into potential criminals. It should also make you think: how can your data be unexpectedly used to bring charges against you or someone else?

China at the wheel

The world is fighting for the transition to electric vehicles, and as we reports from special issues, China is in the lead. Nearly 15 percent of new cars sold there in 2021 were electric, compared to 10 percent in the EU and 4 percent in the US. It already has some of the biggest electric car makers, and makers like Foxconn (which makes the majority of iPhones) are switching to cars. Chinese firms produce more than 50 percent lithium-ion batteries in the world and have captured a large part of the world’s lithium supply, and the country controls at least two thirds world capacities for lithium processing. This is an elucidation of the difficult problem of creating a massive public charging network compatible with a large number of different car brands, the absence of which is one of the main reasons adoption has been slow in the US.

All of this means that your first (or next) electric car will most likely be Chinese. “So what?” you can say. Isn’t almost everything you own made in China? Well yes, but be aware national security implications having hundreds of thousands of mobile touch devices is a very fast as well as heavy devices that, at least in theory, can be remotely— roam the streets, handing over untold amounts of data to their manufacturers, who are under the heel of an increasingly hardline superpower government. The West was furious when it decided that the network equipment manufactured by Huawei supposedly used for espionageand this stuff doesn’t even have wheels.

However, spy hysteria aside, what is clear is that China has the potential to take over the world’s auto markets just as Japan did in the 1970s and 1980s. And it will play a big role in the technological and geopolitical rivalry between China and the rest of the world.

And 8 more WIRED stories on other topics


Credit: www.wired.com /

- Advertisement -

Stay on top - Get the daily news in your inbox

DMCA / Correction Notice

Recent Articles

Related Stories

Stay on top - Get the daily news in your inbox