Logan Paul was scammed on $3.5 million of fake Pokemon cards

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Logan Paul isn’t new to dropping massive amounts on Pokémon cards. He spent millions on vintage cards earlier and in June, even as he bought an A. also wore $150,000 Charizard Card in a boxing ring around his neck. So back in December, when a YouTube personality spent $3.5 million on a sealed box of alleged first-edition base set Pokémon cards, it wasn’t all that strange.

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It got pretty awkward Thursday though, when Paul uploaded a YouTube video revealing he’s been scammed, and that at least one of the boxes doesn’t contain Pokemon cards, but the much less-coveted GI Joe trading cards. .

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“GI Joe?” Paul screams when the scam is discovered. “GI Joe? It could have been something else…” The dramatic music and Paul looked at him as if GI Joe ran over his dog.

Almost immediately after Paul returned his purchase in December, Pokemon card collectors began to discuss that Paul’s carry might be a fake. As Nerdshala sister site ComicBook.net Reportedly, those in the know were suspicious of the seller’s differing explanations of where the box of cards came from, and noticed discrepancies between the box and other verified Pokémon card packs. The website is a thorough analysis of PokéBeach If you want details on those elements.

In a video posted Thursday, Paul and friends open the box in a Chicago hotel with the men who authenticated the card when Paul first bought it, as well as the man who gave the box to Paul for $2.7 million. Sold after buying in dollars.

Paul, the owner of the certification company, discussed what he saw when approving the box, but once it was opened, declared, “We were all deceived.”

Paul does not say in the video whether he will seek reinstatement from the certification company or how he will pursue the original seller. And if you’re wondering if this whole thing is just another Logan Paul stunt to captivate audiences, wonder. The video revealing the alleged scam garnered more than 620,000 views in just three hours.

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