In short: Microsoft yelling about how good Edge is and why it’s so much better than Chrome is nothing new, but Redmond’s recent stats on the browser are pretty interesting. According to its creator, the Edge Sleeping Tabs feature has saved users 273.7 petabytes of RAM over the past 28 days, which is about 39MB of memory for each open tab.

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The statistics were published by the official Microsoft Edge Dev account. It notes that the Sleeping Tabs feature has been used on six billion tabs on Windows devices over the past 28 days, resulting in a savings of 273.7 petabytes (273,700 TB) of RAM, or 39.1 MB of RAM per tab.

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sleeping tabs, added to edge back in January of last year, this is a feature intended for those users who like to keep dozens of browser tabs open at once (ie most of us). This can consume system resources such as RAM and CPU usage, but Sleeping Tab is based on Chromium’s “freezing” technology, which essentially puts unused tabs to “sleep” after they haven’t been accessed for two hours, helping to free up memory and CPU. .

While 39MB per tab might not sound like a huge savings, it can make a difference when you have a lot of tabs open on low-end devices that don’t take up a lot of storage. Sleeping Tabs can also help extend laptop battery life.

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Sleeping tabs are enabled by default in Edge, although the amount of time after which a tab becomes inactive can be changed in the browser’s Settings menu under System & Performance – Optimize Performance.

Back in April, Edge supplanted Safari to become second most popular desktop browser around the world. It currently stands at 10%, which is still far from Chrome’s massive 66% piece of the pie.