Prisma raises $40 million for its open source ‘Rosetta Stone’ for database languages

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When it comes to building databases and developing other server software, different organizations and developers don’t always speak the same language. Today, a startup called Prisma, which has built a platform based on a back-end library that allows users to write in the languages ​​they most intuitively understand, but allows that work to be done within their organization’s broader application ecosystem, is announcing a $40 million commitment. in funding to further expand their business.

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Beginning emphasis on GraphQL, today the company’s technical department – according to CEO Søren Bramer Schmidt (co-founder of the startup with Johannes Schickling in Berlin) – is “a level below that” and supports JavaScript and TypeScript languages, as well as databases in PostgreSQL, MySQL, SQLite, SQL Server, MongoDB and CockroachDB. Its open source Prisma ORM, launched last year, now has over 150,000 developers using it for Node.js and TypeScript projects, growing at an average of 10% every month.

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Schmidt said the plan is to increase investment in this open source tool to attract more users, with the goal of building the first revenue-generating products. These commercial tools, which Prisma describes simply as “Application Data Platform”, are due to launch later this year.

It was the attraction to open source tools and plans for the first commercial steps that attracted investors. Alimeter leads this round with Amplify Partners and Kleiner Perkins – previous investor also participates. Notably, it also has some founders supporting it from other “companies in the ecosystem”, which is a sign of how Prisma is finding its place in this wider landscape of platforms and tools. Among them are the founders of Vercel, PlanetScale, GitHub and SourceGraph.

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(Short note: Schmidt noted that one of the reasons Kleiner Perkins led the seed round in 2018 was that it was difficult to open doors to European backers as a start-up that was pre-earnings. Back then, the company also assumed that it must eventually relocate entirely to the U.S. in order to continue growing.Fast to today and he admits a lot has changed and they are successfully scaling as a business in Berlin.)

Prisma positions itself as a kind of Rosetta stone in the world of development – or, in the metaphor of prisms, an object that allows one source of information to be refracted into different parts. As Schmidt describes it, after a period of only three languages ​​about 15 years ago, there was a rapid spread of languages ​​in programming and database development as part of a larger wave of innovation in programming.

“But then the older and boring ones saw all the good ideas and said that they need to be implemented in them,” he said. For example, Javascript has become a much stronger language over the years. At the same time, he says, database languages ​​continue to proliferate, fueled by a move to cloud computing and a preference for specialized databases for specific purposes. “It’s much easier to host and operate different databases,” he said.

Bigger tech organizations like Google and Twitter have invested a lot of money in internal tools to get around this situation by building “very good tools,” according to Schmidt. But when it comes to a smaller organization, even a tech company, “they may have built something too, but they won’t be able to keep investing in it to keep it up to date. They have poor quality tools. Or nothing at all: “You have to study a lot, and it’s hard to be a professional,” he added.

This is where the Prisma toolkit comes in: it essentially helps people stay compatible with different languages ​​as they code, query, and manage those databases in a more efficient way that speaks volumes about how developers work today.

Schmidt notes that the approach of Google or Twitter – building within the company – remains their biggest competitor at the moment. It’s a bit ironic, as a previous employer, Trustpilot, internally solving the same problem led him to the idea of ​​creating a product to solve a problem for everyone.

“The way developers create apps is constantly evolving,” Alimeter partner Jamin Ball said in a statement. “Prisma breaks down barriers between front-end and back-end teams, and between data engineers, developers, and business analysts. Prisma ORM is a product that developers love and an important step towards modernizing full-stack development.”


Credit: techcrunch.com /

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