NASA shares epic shot of the moon’s creepy shadow during June eclipse


From the image it appears as if the annular “Ring of Fire” eclipse had scorched the North Pole.

NASA’s EPIC or Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera aboard NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory satellite captured the June 10 solar eclipse.

During a solar eclipse, the Moon blocks the Sun and the result can be some strange shadows and strange lights on the Earth’s surface.

But observe the same phenomenon from space and it might look a little more scary.

NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) aboard NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory satellite (DSCOVR) captured an above picture of our world during the June 10 annular solar eclipse seen in the Northern Hemisphere. The shadow cast by the Moon appears as a strange and unstable hazy brown spot over the north polar region.

The image was taken from the L1 Lagrange point, where the satellite hangs about a million miles from Earth, providing a fairly unique perspective.

“Taking pictures of half of Earth’s surface from a distance of four times farther than the Moon’s orbit never ceases to provide surprises,” Adam Szabo, NASA project scientist at DSCOVR, said in a statement.

The June 10 eclipse was a rare annular or “ring of fire” solar eclipse. also produced so many amazing pictures from the surface of our planet, and some even from the air.

The next such eclipse is scheduled for October 14, 2023, and it’s a pretty safe bet that some satellite will be watching from somewhere.

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