In the context: The addictive word guessing game Wordle is popular all over the world due to its easy-to-learn mechanics. In fact, it is so popular that it has spawned many fakes, competitors, and spiritual successors. One such game is “Hardle”, a wordle-like quiz game in which users are asked to name a given song after hearing just a few seconds of the intro.

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Like it verbal cousin, Hurdle gives players a limited number of attempts to guess the song—six in total—before they are locked out of guessing for a day. If you are completely confused, you can skip the tune a little, although it will take one of your guessing cells. It’s an exciting formula, and after trying it for a bit (and winning), I’m already looking forward to tomorrow’s Hurdle.

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So why are we discussing Hurdle today? Moving forward, this will no longer be an independent game: Spotify acquires popular quiz title based on music, very similar to The New York Times purchased Wordle.

Spotify is promising to keep Heardle free for everyone without making any changes to the “look and feel” – except for one thing. After you play Heardle for a day and either succeed or fail, you can listen to go and listen to the full song on Spotify.

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The company hopes this move will attract more users to its site and make Heardle a good music discovery tool. The idea is that you will like the tune you hear while playing Heardle and then you will switch to the Spotify app to listen to it in its entirety. You may then be recommended some other songs, and before you know it, you’ll be down the musical rabbit hole and adding half a dozen tunes to your favorite playlist.

As part of this acquisition, Spotify will localize and expand Heardle’s availability in additional regions outside of the US, UK, Ireland, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. The company has plans for a “deeper” integration of Heardle with Spotify in the future, but didn’t share any details.