The New York Times Edits Wordle Response List Following Rowe vs. Wade Leak

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Perhaps you were playing Wordle this morning and came across a fairly common five-letter word. But if you didn’t refresh your page last week, you may have come across a “fruit” decision that the New York Times felt was too closely related to current events – last week by Politico leaked draft opinion of the Supreme Court, which is ready cancel Rowe vs. Wadeabolishing the constitutional right to abortion.

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The New York Times changed today’s decision to a less politically charged word, although the original decision may still be displayed to users who haven’t reloaded the game.

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“Some users may see an outdated response that appears to be closely related to a major recent news event. This is a completely unintended and coincidental coincidence,” wrote New York Times Games editorial director Everdeen Mason. statementpublished just as Wordle hit the web.

As Mason explains, Wordle’s responses are predefined in its code, which is selected from a pool of five-letter word responses that founder Josh Wardle came up with over a year ago. Not all five-letter words appear on the list – he deliberately left out the most obscure five-letter words, as he wanted the game to be solved more often than not (you also probably won’t find a four-letter noun with an “S” added to the end to form a plural ).

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“When we purchased Wordle in January it was created for a relatively small group of users,” Mason said. “Now we’re busy updating the Wordle technology so everyone always gets the same word.”

Since Wardle joined the New York Times Games, there have been several occasions when two possible solutions to the word. Most recently, this happened at the end of March, when users could get either “FURNACE” or “HARRY” as an answer.

This was because the New York Times removed some obscure words left in the Wordle decision bank, such as “HARRY”, which is not a wizard boy’s name, but an obsolete verb meaning “persistently disturb”. But when Wordle migrated from Wardle’s personal site According to the New York Times, some users’ games were still pulling data from the original Wordle rather than the slightly modified version of the New York Times.

The New York Times reports that “tens of millions” of people play Wordle every day. His “low seven figureacquiring a delightfully simple game seems to be paying off, as the company has stated that it has its own advantages. best quarter to increase the number of users in the “Subscription Based Games” section.




Credit: techcrunch.com /

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