The Twitter test will remind you to add alt text to images.

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In the midst of absolutely no internal chaos anythingTwitter availability the team launched a long-awaited feature test. Ten percent of users who make up the test group will receive reminders to add image descriptions to their photos.

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Image descriptions or alt text are exactly what they sound like: descriptions of what appears in the image. Sometimes these descriptions appear when the image is not loading, but more importantly, they offer context for people using screen readers who may be blind or visually impaired. Alternative text helps ensure that everyone can be included in the conversation.

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This test aims to encourage more people to use alt text. If you have access to this feature, you can go to your account settings, then click “Accessibility” and scroll to the “Pictures” heading. From there, you can turn on a reminder to prompt you to add alt text before sending a Tweet with an image.

“If you forget to add descriptions to your images, turning on a reminder will be of great benefit to you in the future. And to everyone on Twitter,” the platform said in a statement. wrote. “In fact, if everyone turned it on, everyone would help everyone.”

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In April, Twitter started rolling out features that make it more visible when the image has alt text. ALT icons now appear in the bottom corner of photos to show if the image has alt text or not. When you click this button, you can view the description of the image.

But even the most well-meaning among us can sometimes forget to add descriptions to images, so these reminders should come in handy. For users who don’t know what alt text is and why it’s important, these popups can also serve an educational purpose.

“Image descriptions are an easy way to expand access to information for people with disabilities and anyone who wants more context.” – Twitter. explained.

In its announcement thread, Twitter refers to an ongoing discussion about the pitfalls of alt text misuse – sometimes Twitter users use alt text to hide easter eggs or jokes for those who might click the ALT icon. But using image descriptions in this way is confusing for users who actually need alt text for context. However, as more twitterers use accessibility features for their intended purpose, it becomes clearer how to actually write. good alt text.

There is a lot of debate about what constitutes a well-written description of an image. For example, if you see a picture of a woman eating a salad, you probably don’t need to know what color the plate is or if the salad contains toast. Maybe it’s contextual that she’s in the middle of a bite, or that she’s glaring at the salad, or maybe it’s not.

How NASA released first images from the James Webb Space Telescope this week, some Twitter users commented on how detailed the descriptions of the NASA images were. For something as complex, monumental, and mind-blowing as a photograph of a cluster of galaxies, their level of detail makes sense. But there’s a chance you won’t meet Twitter’s 1,000-character limit on what you upload if you’re not on NASA’s social team.

Twitter has also implemented accessibility features such as automatic video captions for the last year. According to the accessibility-focused platform account, the team work on expanding live subtitles in spaces, customizing closed captions, text recognition for alt text and alt text for profile pictures.




Credit: techcrunch.com /

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