In the context: Recently released statements by TikTok employees show that Chinese employees have repeatedly and improperly accessed non-public user data in the US. Despite earlier claims that Tiktok’s user data was protected and controlled by a “US security group,” the social media giant was found to have improperly accessed user data several times and was suspected of possibly leaking information directly to the Chinese government. Now, the TikTok executive has provided Congress with a letter explaining how the company will secure information from ByteDance and host it in an Oracle data center in the US.

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letter TikTok CEO Show Zi Chu was sent to nine US senators to explain how the company will store all information held in the US. Oracle data centers. The data will be periodically reviewed by a US security team.

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Chu acknowledged that the move was part of the social network’s broader data security approach known as Project Texas. Chu was also unabashed in the letter, acknowledging that TikTok is one of “… the most scrutinized platforms in terms of security, and we are committed to removing any doubts about the security of user data in the US.”

The follow-up letter from TikTok was provided in response to requests from Marsha Blackburn, John Thune and several other US senators who questioned the company and its data practices. Their questions were submitted following a message from buzzfeed about ByteDance data protection methods (and disadvantages). TikTok’s response denied any wrongdoing on the part of the company, stating that the allegations and insinuations in the BuzzFeed article are untrue and unsupported by facts.

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Chu’s letter further discusses data controls and confirms the company’s intention to remove all US user data from its current servers once the transition to Oracle is complete. However, he also made it clear that ByteDance’s employees in China would still be working on TikTok, developing algorithms designed to provide personalized recommendations to users of the platform. He also acknowledged that certain videos and comments would remain open to Chinese employees, but only under government-approved conditions.

On Friday, Senator Blackburn said Mr. Chu’s letter proves that concerns about the Chinese Communist Party’s influence on the company are well founded. “The Chinese-run company should have told the truth from the start, but they tried to keep their work under wraps,” she said, adding that TikTok needed to testify before Congress again.