Twitter vs. Elon sues us over books based on memes

- Advertisement -


When Elon Musk announced his intention to end his $44 billion bid to buy Twitter, the social network didn’t give up so easily. Today, Twitter sued CEO of SpaceX and Tesla for refusing to fulfill their contractual obligations to purchase the platform. Lawyers for the company argue that Musk’s concerns about twitter bot numbers are illegal.

- Advertisement -

When you agree to buy a slow growing social media platform for more than it’s worth, there are no refunds, unless the company has seriously misrepresented itself. Even though Twitter has handed over its “fire hose” internal dataMusk said that the information is not enough. So he extended his ongoing public hysteria over Twitter bots, culminating in his claim that the deal fell through.

- Advertisement -

As Twitter wrote in its lawsuit against the eccentric billionaire, “Musk appears to believe that he—unlike any other party subject to Delaware contract law—is free to change his mind, smash the company, disrupt its operation, destroy the stock market.” cost and leave. “. In response to the lawsuit, Musk tweeted, “Oh, irony lol.”

Anyone with a Twitter account (even bots!) saw that Musk was tweet through it. Judging by the memes he posted, he was not at all shocked that he cooled off his $44 billion impulse buy, especially in light of the stock market downturn.

- Advertisement -

Twitter lawyers agreed: “In his press release announcing the deal dated April 25, 2022, Musk called loudly to ‘defeat the spambots.’ But as the market ebbed and the fixed price deal became less attractive, Musk changed his narrative, abruptly demanding “confirmation” that spam was not a major problem on the Twitter platform, and declaring an urgent need to conduct “zeal” from which he bluntly refused. “.

How do you prove that an extremely wealthy online troll is trying to fool you? You show receipts. And the receipts in this case are memes.

Twitter’s lawsuit against Musk has more photos than your standard legal documents. Across the sixty-two pages of the document, the plaintiff shares several images of Musk’s tweets (mostly acquisition memes) to prove that he acted in bad faith. Of course they included poop emoji that Musk tweeted Twitter CEO Parag Agrawal when he tried to respond to the mogul’s spam requests.

Elon Musk responded to Twitter CEO Parag Agrawal with a poop emoji on Twitter

Elon Musk responded to Twitter CEO Parag Agrawal with a poop emoji on Twitter

As part of the agreement between Musk and Twitter, Musk breaks the rules if he denigrates the platform. According to Twitter, this poop emoji is indeed considered a humiliation, but the platform’s lawyers pulled out a few more tweets to prove their point. On two other occasions, Musk flags the SEC’s Twitter account and urges them to investigate Twitter’s financial disclosures that claim that more than 95% of monetized daily active users are human. As the lawsuit states, “Musk’s behavior simply confirms that he wants to avoid a binding contract that he voluntarily signed and harm Twitter in the process.”

Image from Twitter lawsuit against Elon Musk showing he is trying to terminate his contract

Image credits: Twitter

Image from Twitter lawsuit against Elon Musk showing he is trying to terminate his contract

Twitter lawyers also included a meme that Musk posted just yesterday, in which the billionaire laughs along with text mocking the platform: “They said I can’t buy Twitter. Then they will not disclose information about bots. Now they want to force me to buy Twitter in court. Now they have to disclose information about the bots in court.”

He then tweeted a meme of Chuck Norris playing chess and stated, “Chuckmate.”

Elon Musk memes in Twitter lawsuit

Elon Musk memes in Twitter lawsuit

Does Elon Musk understand that Chuck Norris memes weren’t funny before Tesla released its first car? Maybe he’s too busy single-handedly increase the birth rate in the US to keep up with pop culture. However, Twitter used these memes to claim that Musk views this hugely important acquisition as a “complicated joke.”

This is far from the first time we’ve seen memes. got into the courtroom – in 2013, the creators of memes keyboard cat as well as Nyancat earned village after suing Warner Brothers for unauthorized use of their copyright in a video game. This one case was almost ten years ago. Now even group chats where you spill tea can become subpoenaed and featured prominently in a New York Times article.

This isn’t the first time Musk has gotten into serious legal trouble over his bad jokes.

In 2018, Musk tweeted that he was considering Tesla’s privatization at $420 per share and already secured funding. Of course, he was just joking with weedso the SEC accused Musk of fraud due to “false and misleading” tweets. As a result, Musk resigned as chairman of the board of directors of Tesla, the company paid a fine of $ 20 million, and after Agreement with the Securities and Exchange Commission, he should now have tweets about Tesla verified by lawyers-turned-Tweeters.

For the first time, however, memes will play a role in determining the fate of a major corporate takeover. We hope the judges in Delaware office have fun.




Credit: techcrunch.com /

- Advertisement -

Stay on top - Get the daily news in your inbox

DMCA / Correction Notice

Recent Articles

Related Stories

Stay on top - Get the daily news in your inbox